Five of the Most Common Infant Skin Care Issues and Solutions

Common Infant Skin Care Issues and Solutions

Red bumps, strange flakes, and splotchy skin can case parents a great deal of alarm in the first year of their baby’s life. Many parents call their pediatricians at the sight of skin conditions, but most are innocuous and either need no treatment, or can be treated at home.

The issue:

Within the first few weeks of life, you may spot little red bumps covering your baby’s face. Infant acne arises because of a surplus of the mother’s hormones in the baby’s system. It is harmless, and quite natural.

The solution:

Wet your baby’s face when you bathe him, and pat dry, but don’t apply any adult acne creams. Infant acne will simply resolve on its own.

The issue:

Like acne, cradle cap is caused by hormones running amok and creating oily skin conditions. Cradle cap is essentially dandruff that forms a scaly “cap” over a baby’s scalp. It is harmless and often goes away on its own.

The solution:

If you’d like to resolve the condition a bit more quickly, use coconut oil or petroleum jelly and massage it into your baby’s scalp, shampooing afterward. If that fails, try a special brush that will gently scrub the flakes away.

The issue:

Infant eczema is one of the most common infant skin conditions. It appears as a red rash anywhere on an infant’s body, and can be the result of dry skin. Eczema does itch and irritate babies, so treating it will make your baby more comfortable.

The solution:

Use a light, hypoallergenic moisturizing cream on affected areas. If this doesn’t resolve your baby’s eczema, ask your pediatrician about a prescription cortisone cream to relieve inflammation and itching.

The issue:

Stork bites look like small red splotches at the nape of a baby’s neck. They are the result of dilated capillaries and are harmless.

The solution:

Stork bites do not need treatment, and will resolve on their own with time.

The issue:

Mongolian spots are large, grey-blue spots that occur on the buttocks or legs of some babies, most frequently those of African, Asian, or Indian descent. They are innocuous and are simply varitaions in the skin’s pigment.

The solution:

Mongolian spots will disappear on their own and need no treatment.

You can breathe easy when you see one of these common skin conditions, as they are not harmful to your baby. But if you notice a persistent rash or a rash with fever, consult your pediatrician.

 

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